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Reichstag dome closed amid terrorism fears
Photo: DPA

Reichstag dome closed amid terrorism fears

Published: 22 Nov 2010 12:08 GMT+01:00
Updated: 22 Nov 2010 12:08 GMT+01:00

The press office for the German parliament or Bundestag announced Monday morning the dome and roof, popular tourist attractions that offer panoramic views of the capital, would be closed indefinitely.

The announcement followed a weekend report in news magazine Der Spiegel that said Islamic extremists were planning an armed raid on the 116-year-old building, which houses the parliament, in the style of the 2008 Mumbai attack, in which at least 175 people were killed.

Security around the Reichstag had been strengthened “to a considerable extent,” Berlin Interior Minister Ehrhart Körting said. He said there were extra barriers and 60 extra police stationed around the building. The extra layers of security come on top of a previous security boost last week.

Visits to the Reichstag will still be possible for groups that have registered in advance.

Der Spiegel reported on Saturday that German security authorities had received information from an extremist who has been phoning the federal criminal police (BKA) with information.

However police have since said they have no concrete information of an attack on the Reichstag. Nothing was known about precise locations of any possible attacks, a police spokesman said.

Germany has been on high alert since last Wednesday when federal Interior Minister Thomas de Maizière announced the government had “concrete” indications that Islamists were planning an imminent attack.

Germany has nearly 5,000 troops stationed in Afghanistan and this is seen as a key source of Islamist anger against the country.

DPA/The Local/dw

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

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Your comments about this article

14:51 November 22, 2010 by adipk
they are only extremists or terrorist, dont put name of religion. they must be destroyed before doing any thing
16:40 November 22, 2010 by XFYRCHIEF
And while all eyes are on the Reichstag, it would be the opportune time to strike elsewhere, wouldn't it? Or could it be a test of how the supposed target would be defended to expose weaknesses? Maybe its the CIA behind this?
17:17 November 22, 2010 by William Thirteen
'Visits to the Reichstag will still be possible for groups that have registered in advance.'

how inconvenient to have schedule their attacks in advance. i suppose they'll be suing the government for discrimination....
18:47 November 22, 2010 by Gretl
XFYRCHIEF - You are certifiable. CIA has much bigger fish to fry.
19:20 November 22, 2010 by XFYRCHIEF
GRETI - It's a joke...just responding to a post telling me that the suitcase "bomb" in Namibia was part of a CIA plot and how Namibia is a puppet state controlled by the CIA.
19:53 November 22, 2010 by mahwish
you should focus on the root cause rather than highlighting the "Religion" because I think already the whole Globe is in fight of Religion, so be precise and focused to resolve the problem, until unless you don´t get sure about the hidden cause, don´t predict.
20:43 November 22, 2010 by Jerr-Berlin
It's a little complicated...(this global war on terrorism)...you might want to read Eric Margolis (American Raj, Liberation or Domination) and Chalmers Johson (the Blowback Trilogy) to gain a little insight...it isn't as though previous history in the Middle East since WW1 had nothing to do with current circumstances...
21:18 November 22, 2010 by Cromulent
These are just the wages of Islam.
22:31 November 22, 2010 by Lachner
I think that the German Government should not only secure the Reichstag but also the country's main airports, train stations, all tourist attractions in the main cities and wherever there are large crowd gatherings (football stadiums, shopping centers, hotels, etc.). The favorite tool for terrorists is to spark "terror" (duh!) to the maximum amount of people possible in order to spark chaos and anarchy such as what happened on September 11th in New York City, 4/11 in Madrid and the Mumbai attack. My biggest fear is that terrorists will strike the train system in Germany which would spark massive chaos and fear around the nation. Nonetheless, I believe that if one nation is prepared to prevent such an attack is Germany. The GS9 of the Bundespolizei is an elite counter terrorism special force that is among the World's elite so that makes me feel more comfortable. I happened to be studying in the US during the September 11th attacks and it was a frightening moment.

God forbid such an event happens in this beautiful and peaceful land.
23:34 November 22, 2010 by xx.weirich.xx
I agree with Lachner...

Being a citizen of America, we're pretty much always on high alert here and I avoid places with large populations out of fear of attacks. What makes it even worse is the knowledge that schools are pretty high on the priority list too...

It's bad enough that these sick religious nuts attack as they do, but why Germany..?
01:24 November 23, 2010 by wenddiver
It is way past time that the West start to limit the reasons and numbers of people who adhere to Islam (a violent political ideology that poses as a Religion) who get to enter or stay in the West.

I don't know why this is so hard, we have had two World Wars and a Cold War to practice it. Tell them we will be open for business again whhen they find another hobby than murder and terrorism.
01:52 November 23, 2010 by Lachner
I think that Germany is being targeted since they are an important U.S. Ally, they have several U.S. military bases in their country and they currently have German troops deployed in Afghanistan. Other U.S. Allies that are currently targeted by Al-Qaeda are the UK, Spain and France. Another strategic reason for threats to U.S. Allies is that for terrorist groups it is now more difficult to execute terrorist attacks in the U.S. after the 9/11 attacks in NYC since the FBI, CIA, Homeland Security and the Armed Forces are now highly aware and vigilant. Therefore, it is easier for terrorist cells to attack allies in Europe, there are more Islamic extremists that could already be living in these countries and these countries are closer to the Middle East (Iraq, Afghanistan and Israel) which is their main battle front against the US.
04:54 November 23, 2010 by belladons
I personally want to thank the German government for doing the right thing, outstanding decision. Now, if the American people would only understand why this threat is important, maybe they'd follow the German lead. This threat is not a joke. Thank God I am of German ancestry. I love being German.
08:17 November 23, 2010 by DoronIsrael
German indifferent to what their country could Loatrah

When there is more in German Moslmymmashr

It's not racism Abll that's what going to happen that Germany Tihiharobah Muslim beggars and more broadly educated and alerts for attacks.
18:05 November 23, 2010 by montedoro44
You are lucky that in Germany you can print phrases like "Islamic extremists" and "indications that Islamists were planning an imminent attack". In the USA, bastion of free speech, our mainstream news media can't or won't name the enemy. It is already watered down, suggesting that "Islamist" is not an integral element in the religion/ideology of Islam. TG there are some Muslims who either publicly or secretly repudiate this, and don't live it out.
23:32 November 23, 2010 by Machumint
@XFYRCHIEF and Gretl, Do your homework. Why would German official Thomas de Maizière dismiss the Namibia dummy bomb as a "local security test" when, meanwhile, Namibian authorities have arrested the airport security chief and charged him with a crime, Namibian authorities are still trying to determine whether he acted alone, nobody has claimed the laptop case containing the US-made dummy bomb, and after the suspect's arraignment, (quoting BBC/GBC) "Journalists were not even allowed to take pictures of the suspect - this has never been a problem in other cases, our correspondent says." This was a false flag bomb delivery test that was not supposed to go public. False flag attacks have been used as pretext for boosting security and starting wars for 150+ years.
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