• Germany's news in English
 
app_header_v3

Half of Germans want the Deutsche mark back

DDP/The Local · 29 Jun 2010, 14:09

Published: 29 Jun 2010 14:09 GMT+02:00

Some 51 percent of those surveyed by market research institute Ipsos admitted they wanted their old currency back.

Just 30 percent said that they rejected the idea, while another 18 percent were undecided, the Hamburg-based institute reported.

German confidence in Europe's single currency has been rocked in recent months by the Greek debt crisis and the eurozone's ensuing bailout of Athens. Though it remains considerably stronger versus the US dollar than the mark was back in 1998, the euro's precipitous decline has sparked concern in Europe's largest economy.

Longing for the mark, replaced on paper in 1999 and as physical notes and coins in 2002, depended on the respondent’s age. People between 50 and 64-years-old said they wanted to see a mark comeback, a desire echoed by only 42 percent of those between 16 and 29.

The split between eastern and western Germany was marginal, with 52 percent of those in the west and 48 percent in the east saying they preferred the mark to the euro.

Story continues below…

Education also played a role in opinions. Only 34 percent of those who graduated from a college-preparatory high school said they’d fill their pocketbooks with the old bills, compared to two-thirds of those who completed vocational school, Ipsos found.

Some 1,000 representative Germans between the ages of 16 ad 64 were interviewed between April 9 and 12 for the results.

DDP/The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

18:03 June 29, 2010 by Bushdiver
The Euro brought practically nothing to the average citizen. It didn't take long until the prices were twice as expensive as with the DM while at the same time wages were cut in half.Of course going back to the DM won't change what has already happened.
03:11 June 30, 2010 by Gretl
My office mates continually complain that they want the DM back. Of course, as we are Bayern, they also complain about supporting the rest of the nation. I would support the independent kingdom of Bayern, 'cause if it OK for Belgium, it should be good for everybody. And while we are at it, I like to let the South secede from the US, and I would like the US west of the Mississippi (or just the mountain and pacific timezones) become its own country.
09:50 June 30, 2010 by Talonx
I would like to see an age-group breakdown of this information.
12:13 June 30, 2010 by snorge
@Gretl...

Don;t forget the American Idians....
18:30 June 30, 2010 by Der Grenadier aus Aachen
Considering that I regularly travel between the US, Germany, Holland, and Austria, I definitely don't want the DM back. It's much easier for me to just have two accounts, one in USD and on in EUR. That was the real objective behind the Euro; to start blurring the borders between the countries in Europe.
07:20 July 1, 2010 by JAMessersmith
So does this mean that Germans feel like they're getting USED by USE (United States of Europe)? I suppose it's better news than half of Germans wanting the Ostmark back... now that would be cause for alarm!
19:03 July 1, 2010 by JohnnesKönig
Here is are only a few comments from English speaking people that see the advantage of the Euro... But I know that more than half of German speaking Citizens want to have the prosperity they enjoyed before the Euro. It was only beneficial to foreigners and not us! We have had enough of helping the penner...
23:41 July 1, 2010 by Der Grenadier aus Aachen
Actually, I would be a German, that happens to also speak English. And I can assure you, you are just plain wrong. I have many friends who don't want the DM back for the same reasons.
23:25 July 2, 2010 by saycheese
It is a sad fact that more economies of Europe would implode like the Greek, Spanish, Portugues and Irish ones. And it is going to get worse. Let's face it...people and nationalities have different abilities. People ignore that because of political correctness. So, the natural demise of the Euro is just up ahead, because it will simply not be sustainable. The handwriting is on the wall. Sure, it is convenient to have one universal currency, but for some countries, shouldering the burden of other country's underperforming economies (to use a mild description), will not be forever an option. Ignore these facts at everybody's financial peril.
23:25 July 3, 2010 by wenddiver
50% of Germans want the Deutsce Mark back.

Yes and 100% of Foreigners who are selling things in Germany.

The Euro is a Franc, nobody is fooled.
22:08 July 7, 2010 by testor
Hello Everyone,

going back to the D-mark is a question of national soverinty. I can assure you that bailouts will cause hyperinflation. Does anyone recall 1923 hyperinflation? Because your about to face that again. Your only option is to restore the D-Mark and put threw a glass steagall banking reform in the spirit of FDR.

Also it doesn't matter how many people want to go back to the d-mark or not. If you want to survive you will restore the d-mark and ram threw a glass steagall bank reform.

down with the british empire and their corrupt casino banking system

http://www.bueso.de/

http://www.larouchepac.com
Today's headlines
'No injuries' after blast near Bavarian migrant centre
A sign at the Zirndorf migrant centre. Photo: DPA

A suitcase packed with aerosol cans has exploded near a migrant centre on the outskirts of Nuremberg, according to Reuters. Initial reports suggest no injuries.

Not your average student digs: 'amazing' plastic bubble
Photo: DPA

Could this wacky experiment be the future of student housing?

Police settle train violence over smelly feet
Not the feet in question. Photo: Caitlin Regan/Flickr

A fellow passenger's foot odour proved too much for one traveller to stomach.

How Berliners are responding to the Bavaria attacks
Photo: DPA

Is fear of terrorism creeping up on the capital?

Munich gunman was far-right racist: media reports
Photo: DPA

According to research by the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung the Munich gunman was proud to have been born on the same day as Hitler and hated Turks and Arabs.

Ansbach suicide attack
Ansbach bomber ‘influenced’ by third person: officials
Photo: DPA

Officials in Bavaria have said that the man who blew himself up in an apparent Islamist attack on Sunday was influenced by an as yet unknown person.

What is the link between the attacks in Germany last week?
Police on guard in Munich. Photo: DPA

And how likely are 'copycat' attacks?

Rights experts call for calm after string of violent attacks
Bavaria has called for soldiers to protect the German border. Photo: DPA

Human rights groups and legal experts are warning the government to react responsibly to the attacks and rampages which have taken place in Germany in recent days.

France church attacker had been arrested in Germany
Photo: DPA

A neighbour described the man as a "ticking time bomb".

Dutch join hunt for German terrorists-turned-outlaws
From left to right: Ernst-Volker Staub, Daniela Klette and Burkhard Garweg. Photo: DPA.

Dutch police on Tuesday told people to be on the lookout for three German far-left militants, at large for decades and suspected of a string of recent heists.

Sponsored Article
Why you should attend an international job fair
DPA
Gallery
IN PICTURES: How Munich responded to shooting spree
Sponsored Article
Avoid hidden fees when sending money overseas
Lifestyle
10 rookie errors all Brits make when they arrive in Germany
National
Bavaria train attack: Were police right to shoot to kill?
Sponsored Article
Why Swiss hospitality graduates are in demand
National
How to get German citizenship (or just stay forever)
Sponsored Article
Five things Americans should know about voting abroad
Technology
Brexit will turn Berlin into 'Europe’s startup capital'
Travel
Six soothing day trips to escape the bustle of Berlin
International
'Germany needs to make UK come to its senses'
Features
Six odd things Germans do in the summer
Sponsored Article
Why expats choose international health insurance
Travel
These 10 little-known German towns are a must see
Features
How two gay dads cut through German red tape to start a family
Sponsored Article
Health insurance for expats in Germany: a quick guide
National
Five things to know about guns in Germany
Sponsored Article
Avoid hidden fees when sending money overseas
Culture
10 things you need to know before attending a German wedding
National
Eight weird habits you'll pick up living in Germany
Lifestyle
Six reasons 'super-cool' Berlin isn't all it's cracked up to be
Sponsored Article
Why Swiss hospitality graduates are in demand
Society
Only one country likes getting naked on the beach more than Germany
Lifestyle
23 ridiculously fascinating things you never knew about Berlin
Sponsored Article
Why you should attend an international job fair
Culture
8 German words that perfectly sum up your 20s
Lifestyle
Can't make it past the door at Berlin's most famous club? Help is at hand
Business & Money
Why Frankfurt could steal London's crown as Europe's finance capital
Features
6 surprising things I learned about Germany while editing The Local
Culture
Five sure-fire ways to impress Germans with your manners
10,756
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd